Comments Off on How Dealing with Nuclear Powers Isn’t A Simple Fix: Iran and North Korea

On Monday, October 2nd, the Reiff Center hosted Dr. Michael Poznansky and Dr. Rachel Whitlark, both experts in political science dealing with topics related to security. The entire room was packed, all intent to listen to what the experts had to say. Opening Statements Each speaker was allotted between five – seven minutes of talking…

Comments Off on Brutality Under the Badge – Corruption and Violence inside Mexico’s Police Force

In Mexico, torture, enforced disappearances, and murder are common occurrences. The torture can include beatings, waterboarding, electric shocks, and sexual abuse. Citizens go missing never to be heard from or seen again. The large number of killings has investigators overwhelmed and many bodies go unidentified. This sounds like the work of the drug cartels, but…

Comments Off on Crossing The Red Line: United States Launches Military Airstrike Against Syria

For the residents of Khan Sheikhoun, the morning of April 4, 2017 was just another day of the ongoing civil war that has taken place in Syria since the year 2011. The residents were situated west of Aleppo in the Idlib Province. Numerous warring factions have claimed the lives of the town of around fifty…

Comments Off on Corruption in Romania: Old Habits are Hard to Break

Romania is not a country that you hear about often in the news. Located along the Black Sea, the country has not been in the center of Eastern European crises, such as the mass refugee migrations that have shaken Hungary and Bulgaria. Though Romania may not be a sexy topic as far as international politics…

Comments Off on The Rohingya: One of the Most Persecuted Minorities in the World

History The Rohingya are a small Muslim group of about 1.1 million people living primarily in Myanmar (Burma until 1989). Though many of them have been living in Myanmar for generations, and some have settled in Myanmar in a region known as the Rakhine State, or Arakan, as early as the 15th century, they are not…

Comments Off on Protecting Civilians from Violence: A Paradigm Shift for Peacekeeping?

The following blog has been contributed by our special guest blogger – Aaron Bazin – who is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army and NATO strategist. A peacekeeper of MONUSCO Force Intervention Brigade on foot patrol in the town of Pinga, North Kivu province, stops to interact with the local children. Pinga is located…

Comments Off on Afghan Refugees to Face New Struggles after Returning ‘Home’

By the end of 2016, aid officials predict that over 1.5 million Afghan migrants will return to Afghanistan – either voluntarily or by force. Since 1979 and the early 1980’s, Afghans have been fleeing the country, first due to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, then the rise of the Taliban in the 1990’s, and lastly…

Comments Off on Is There a Connection Between Brexit and Xenophobia?

On June 23rd, a referendum was held in the United Kingdom where over 30 million people voted on whether or not the country should stay in the European Union. The Leave Campaign won by 52% to 48%, shocking Europe and the rest of the world. Background To fully understand why the UK voted in favor…

Comments Off on Civil Unrest in Ethiopia Leads to Government Crackdown

Ethiopia is one of East Africa’s fastest growing economies. Though its per capita income is much lower than the regional average, the economy doubled the regional economic growth average with an annual growth rate of 10.8%. The percentage of Ethiopians living in extreme poverty has decreased from 55.3% in 2000 to 33.5% in 2011. This…

Comments Off on Behind Turkey’s Failed Military Coup

  On July 15th 2016 just before 11:00 pm, the country of Turkey experienced its fifth military coup in the past 60 years. However, this illegal attempt to overthrow the government was different from the others, and there is still missing information regarding what happened. This post analyzes the causes of the coup by examining Turkey’s…